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Nagasaki Bio Park

Unique experience in Nagasaki

Hello everyone! Today I’m going to tell you about my time at Nagasaki Bio Park, a zoo that is not like any other zoo I’ve ever seen! Different from most zoos, they take pride in providing a natural environment for the animals and insects there. You won’t see any cages for most of the animals living there — except for very young and vulnerable species. If you’re an animal lover like me, this is the perfect place for you and your friends or family to visit.

 

To get there, we took the bus from Nagasaki Station bright and early around 8:30 AM, and it directly took us to the park. After an hour-long bus ride, we were dropped off right at the park and were immediately greeted by a llama at the entrance. We conveniently purchased our tickets from their online site, which cost 2,300 yen per person for admission to both the Biopark and PAW (Pet Animal World). Upon entering, I was so surprised at how clean and organized the park was, and it certainly looked larger than the photos. 

Petting Capybara

Nagasaki Bio Park

The highlight of the day was definitely the adorable capybaras! You can buy hay or pellets for them for 100 yen to feed the world’s largest rodents. As they are not in cages, you are free to pet them and take lots of cute photos with them. It’s not often that you get to see capybaras, let alone interact with them!

Nagasaki Bio Park
Nagasaki Bio Park

In addition, there are plenty of other animals to see, including relatively exotic pals, such as lemurs, monkeys, giraffes, cavies, anteaters, and more! You can even feed the squirrel monkeys for another 100 yen, but don’t get scared if they jump on your head!

After being a little tired from all the fun, we sat down and took a break at one of many of Bio Park’s restaurants, where you can order Japanese classics such as curry rice and udon, or hamburgers and pizza if you’re in the mood for Western food. There are numerous other resting spots throughout the park in case you need to take a seat and relax.

PAW section

Our last exhibit of the day was in the PAW section. Inside, there were so many precious critters such as guinea pigs, rabbits, prairie dogs, etc. Since these animals are very small and vulnerable, they’re separated from the rest of the park. Of course, you get to feed them veggies and hay after paying the small price of 200 yen.

Nagasaki Bio Park
Nagasaki Bio Park

We finished our time at Nagasaki Bio Park at the gift shop near the exit, at which we bought many capybara-themed gifts to bring back home. My heart was so full after a long day of spending time with so many wonderful animals, and I am so excited to go back one day!

For more information about Nagasaki Bio Park, including transportation, opening hours, special events, and more, please visit their English website . You can also often catch the Bio Park’s staff doing live streams with the animals on their Instagram and YouTube channel as well.

 

By KIE client N.B.

 

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